Knowledge Bank Adds West One Loans BTL Criteria to Platform


Knowledge Bank has added West One Loans buy-to-let criteria to its search platform.

West One revamped its buy-to-let loan credentials last month and they have now been included in Knowledge The Bank’s platform, which includes more than 135,000 individual criteria covering more than 270 lenders.

West One’s BTL Managing Director, Andrew Ferguson, said: “As a lender proud to use technology to ensure a seamless product journey, partnering with Knowledge was a no-brainer.

The Knowledge Bank is an essential tool for brokers to find lender criteria, and adding our metrics will help raise awareness of our industry-leading range so we can continue to grow in the industry.

Knowledge Bank Founder and Managing Director, Nicola Firth, adds: “Having West One’s full suite of buy-to-let products on our platform is a great benefit for brokers. It’s a trusted lender and the team’s flexible underwriting approach and customer service ensure brokers get quick decisions.

Our industry-leading criteria information has shown strong interest from brokers seeking ‘first-time owners’, so West One’s range will be a valuable addition for brokers working with the growing number of new owners joining the industry. .

Last September, the lender launched a range of green BTL products as part of a series of environmental products it is developing across its loan range.

The move was part of the specialist lender’s new green campaign, called Funding the Future, backed by its parent company Enra Specialist Finance.

The BTL green product range is available on West One’s broker portal for standard properties with an A to C energy performance certificate.

Rates start at 65% LTV and 70% LTV with two- and five-year fixed rate options available, starting at 3.04%, with a fee of 1.25%.

Loan sizes start at £50,000 up to a maximum of £1.5m and although not available for new builds, conversions are permitted.

Previous Rightmove sees record demand in January
Next FSCS lists mortgage advisers among companies in default